• Extractions

    In most cases, a tooth may need to be pulled when other less radical procedures, such as amalgams or restoration, make it impossible or imprudent to save your child's original tooth. Advanced anesthetic techniques today greatly minimize discomfort associated with a tooth extraction. First, the area

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  • Extractions

    General Procedure When restoration procedures such as root canal therapy, crowns, or fillings are not enough to save a tooth, it may need to be pulled, or extracted. Tooth extraction procedures today are far less painful than ever before, thanks to powerful anesthetics and sedatives. In many cases,

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  • Fillings

    There are three basic kinds of fillings used to restore teeth after decay is removed: amalgams, composites and stainless steel crowns. Amalgams Most dental amalgams are silver in color and are made from a mixture of mercury and an alloy of silver, tin, and copper. Mercury makes up about 45-50 percent

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  • Fillings

    Frequently asked questions: dental fillings Are dental amalgams safe? Is it possible to have an allergic reaction to amalgam? Is it true that dental amalgams have been banned in other countries? Is there a filling material that matches tooth color? If my tooth doesn't hurt and my filling is still in

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  • Flap Surgery

    Your bone and gum tissue should fit snugly around your teeth like a turtleneck. When you have periodontal disease, this supporting tissue and bone is destroyed, forming "pockets" around the teeth. Over time, these pockets become deeper, providing a larger space for bacteria to thrive and wreak havoc. As

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  • Flossing

    What is flossing? Flossing is a method for removing bacteria and other debris that cannot be reached by a toothbrush. It generally entails a very thin piece of synthetic cord you insert and move up and down between the sides of two adjoining teeth. Why is flossing important? Many dentists believe

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  • Flossing

    Flossing is a method for removing bacteria and other debris that cannot be reached by a toothbrush. It generally entails a very thin piece of synthetic cord inserted and moved up and down between the sides of two adjoining teeth. Floss removes plaque and debris that stick to teeth and gums. It also increases

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  • Fluoride

    For decades, fluoride has been held in high regard by the dental community as an important mineral that strengthens tooth enamel, which thereby helps to prevent decay of tooth structures. Water fluoridation is endorsed by nearly every major health and safety-related organization in the world. Communities

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  • Fluoride Facts

    For decades, fluoride has been held in high regard by the dental community as an important mineral that is absorbed into and strengthens tooth enamel, thereby helping to prevent decay of tooth structures. In nearly every U.S. community, public drinking supplies are supplemented with sodium fluoride

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  • Fluorosis

    Fluorosis is a condition in which your body has been exposed to too much fluoride. In normal doses (typically found in a safe drinking water system and an ADA-approved toothpaste), fluoride is a healthy compound that promotes strong teeth, which has the ability to fight cavities and other problems. But

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  • Gingivitis/Gum Disease

    Periodontal disease is a condition in which the structures that support the teeth, including the gums and bone surrounding each tooth, become infected and begin to break down. Periodontal disease (also known as "periodontitis") can be influenced by the body's response to infection caused by the bacteria

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  • Grafts

    Soft tissue grafts are sometimes performed to treat gum disease, or correct other abnormalities. The procedure involves taking gum tissue from the palate or another donor source to cover an exposed root in order to even the gum line and reduce sensitivity. Periodontal procedures are available to

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  • Guidance Eruption

    Guidance eruption is a method used to create enough room for crowded lower permanent incisors. Crowding can often be seen with the eruption of the permanent teeth of the lower jaw at 6 to 7 years old. The permanent incisors will usually compensate for this crowding by erupting behind the primary teeth.

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  • Gum Disease (Gingivitis)

    Gingivitis is the medical term for early gum disease, or periodontal disease. In general, gum disease can be caused by long-term exposure to plaque, the sticky but colorless film on teeth that forms after eating or sleeping. Gum disease originates in the gums, where infections form from harmful bacteria

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  • Impacted Teeth/Wisdom Teeth

    Your child's third set of molars are no different than any other tooth, save for the fact that they are the last to erupt, or grow, into the mouth. Because they typically do so at around the age of 18 to 20, when adolescents are close to turning into adults, these teeth are commonly referred to as "wisdom

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  • Implants

    Before development of dental implants, dentures were the only alternative to replacing a missing tooth or teeth. Implants are synthetic structures that are placed in the area of the tooth normally occupied by the root. Implants are anchored to the jawbone or metal framework on the bone and act as

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  • Infection Control

    Standards and Best Practice With all of the increased media attention on infection outbreaks such as AIDS and multi-drug resistant strains of viruses, it's no wonder people have heightened concerns about infection control during a medical procedure. Gloves, gowns and masks are required to be worn

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  • Introduction

    Does mercury in the silver fillings in your mouth pose any long-term health risks? Does fluoride, in spite of everything we've been told since childhood, actually cause more harm than good? What does the latest research reveal about tobacco use on your overall oral health? This section is dedicated

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  • Jaw Disorders

    People who grind their teeth can sometimes develop a serious problem with their jaw, which left untreated, can adversely affect the teeth, gums and bone structures of the mouth. One of the most common jaw disorders is related to a problem with the temporomandibular joint, the joint that connects your

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  • Jaw disorders/TMD<br>(temporomandibular disorders)

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects the lower jaw, called the mandible, to the temporal bone at the side of the head. Because these joints are flexible, the jaw can move smoothly up and down and side to side, enabling us to talk, chew and yawn. Muscles attached to and surrounding the jaw joint

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  • Jaw/TMJ

    People who grind their teeth can sometimes develop a serious problem with their jaw, which left untreated, can adversely affect the teeth, gums and bone structures of the mouth. One of the most common jaw disorders is related to a problem with the temporomandibular joint, the joint that connects your

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  • Lacerations and Cuts

    Any kind of cut to your face and the delicate soft tissues inside your mouth should be addressed immediately in order to prevent further tissue damage and infection. If a traumatic injury involves a broken facial bone such as the jaw, nose, chin or cheek, maxillofacial surgery may be required. With

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  • Latex Allergy

    Naturally occurring latex has been linked in recent years to allergic reactions in people who use such products as latex gloves. The proteins in the latex, which can also become airborne, can cause problems in vulnerable people such as breathing problems and contact dermatitis. Some allergic reactions,

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  • Managing Pain

    There are many methods for relieving oral pain. They include: Ice packs on the affected area. Avoiding hard candy or ice. Avoiding sleeping on your stomach. Dentists use a wide array of pain management tools, including: Anesthetics such as Novocaine. Analgesics such as aspirin

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  • Maxillofacial Surgery

    When facial reconstruction, including procedures involving the oral cavity, is called for, a specialist is needed. Surgical procedures of the neck and head area are performed by a maxillofacial surgeon. Common maxillofacial procedures include denture-related procedures and jaw surgery. Jaw Correction Protruding

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  • Medication and Heart Disease

    Certain kinds of medications can have an adverse effect on your teeth. Long ago, children exposed to tetracycline developed tooth problems, including discoloration, later in life. The medication fell out of use, however, and is not an issue today. The best precaution is to ask your family physician

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  • Medications

    Some dental procedures, such as tooth extractions and oral surgery, may call for our office to prescribe medications before or after a procedure. These medications are used to prevent or fight an infection, or to relieve any post-operative discomfort and pain. For these reasons, it is extremely important

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  • Missing Teeth

    Fixed bridges and implants are often used to replace missing teeth and to correct some kinds of bite problems. Crowns and bridges are the most effective procedure for replacing missing teeth or bite problems.

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  • Mouth Guards

    Anyone who participates in a sport that carries a significant risk of injury should wear a mouth protector. Sports like basketball, baseball, gymnastics, and volleyball all pose risks to your gum tissues, as well as your teeth. We usually think of football and hockey as the most dangerous to the teeth,

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  • Mouth Rinses

    The Food and Drug Administration classifies mouth rinses into two categories - therapeutic and cosmetic. In general, therapeutic rinses with fluoride have been shown to actually fight cavities, plaque and gingivitis. On the other hand, cosmetic rinses merely treat breath odor, reduce bacteria and/or

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  • Mouth Rinses

    Mouth rinses can have therapeutic benefits; others are only cosmetic in nature. Some have both attributes. The Food and Drug Administration even classifies mouth rinses this way.In general, some therapeutic rinses with fluoride have been shown to actually fight cavities, plaque and gingivitis formation.

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  • Nutrition and Your Teeth

    It has long been known that good nutrition and a well-balanced diet is one of the best defenses for your oral health. Providing your body with the right amounts of vitamins and minerals helps your teeth and gums—as well as your immune system—stay strong and ward off infection, decay and disease. Harmful

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  • Old and Unsightly Fillings

    Newer kinds of fillings made from composite resins and porcelain can restore unsightly fillings; many people are surprised how natural these kinds of filling materials can make a tooth once covered by the old-fashioned silver amalgams.

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  • Oral Cancer

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers today and has one of the lowest survival rates, with thousands of new cases being reported each year. Fewer than half of all people diagnosed with oral cancer are ever cured. Moreover, people with many forms of cancer can develop complications—some of

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  • Oral Health Products

    Visit any pharmacy or the health and beauty section of a supermarket today, and you are faced with a large, and many say confusing, array of over-the-counter remedies and devices designed to help you tend to your hygiene and health-care needs. There are many high-quality products on the market today.

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Office Hours

Monday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

9:00 am-2:00 pm

Thursday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

By Appointment Only

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed